Librarians for Net Neutrality

image from wikimedia commons showing people in a dark room with lit phones saying SAVE THE INTERNET

Like librarians around the country, the Vermont Library Association is deeply concerned about the recent changes to the regulations regarding Net Neutrality.  Throughout the development and growth of the Internet equal access to information has been the accepted norm.  Net neutrality protects those making the content from censorship and provides users of the Internet with the freedom they need to easily access any and all information.  In particular, Vermont residents are uniquely vulnerable to the FCC’s relaxing of net neutrality rules.  As a rural state we all rely on the Internet to access content we might not otherwise be able to find and our small business community needs to be able to reach customers across the state and around the country.

Net Neutrality is the belief that the companies who provide our Internet access should not have the ability to force content creators to pay more based on the information they provide, or even possibility block content they don’t approve of.  Net Neutrality protects consumers from being charged more based on their Internet use, allows individuals to create their own content without fear they will have to pay to have other’s find it, and gives us all equal access to any content on the Internet.  Sadly, Net Neutrality is no longer in place.  However, Vermont librarians will continue to push for a reinstatement of these norms in order to protect our patrons.  We will continue to offer free access to the Internet at our libraries across the state.  A free and open Internet is so very valuable to our state so residents are able to learn, explore, build businesses, and participate in the world provided to us through the Internet.  As librarians will we everything we can to fight for all Vermonters.

– Angele Mott Nickerson – VLA Intellectual Freedom Committee

New Tool: Report a Challenge to Library Resources

The Vermont Library Association is launching a form entitled Report A Challenge to Library Resources  (direct link) that will enable librarians from across the state to report material challenges at their library. The information gathered from this form will go directly to the Intellectual Freedom Committee of the VLA and may be shared with the following professional organizations: Vermont Department of Libraries, the Vermont School Library Association, and the Office of Intellectual Freedom of the American Library Association.

Yearly, VLA will share non-confidential statistics gathered from this form on its website in a similar fashion to those found here:  http://www.ala.org/bbooks/frequentlychallengedbooks/statistics

Anyone who has any questions or concerns about this form should contact Vermont Library Association President Virgil Fuller at vermontlibrariespresident@gmail.com or Ray Brior, Chair of the Vermont Library Association Intellectual Freedom Committee at Raymond.Brior@jsc.edu

The Vermont Library Association (VLA) is an educational organization working to develop, promote, and improve library and information services and librarianship in the state of Vermont

Press Release: John Swan Lecture with Dawn Sova

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
Press Contact: Raymond Brior
Phone: 802-635-1495
Email: Raymond.Brior@jsc.edu

January 14, 2014,

Vermont Library Association with the Department of Libraries presents The Bi-Annual John Swan Intellectual Freedom Lecture with Dawn Sova

Monday, January 27, 2014 at the Pavilion Auditorium

109 State Street
Montpelier, VT 05609
6:00-8:00 PM Free and Open to the Public

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National Speaker on Digital Marketing and Privacy

Burlington Area Access TV Organizations Bring National Speaker on Digital Marketing and Privacy
Contact Lauren-Glenn Davitian, davitian@cctv.org 802-862-3966 x12

On Thursday, September 22, 2011 from 7 p.m. – 9 p.m. at Champlain College, Alumni Auditorium, Jeff Chester of the Center for Digital Democracy will speak on how marketers track online and digital footprints, threats to privacy and dramatic changes in the delivery of news, information and entertainment. Digital Media at the Crossroads: Content & Control in the Internet Era is free and open to the public. Chester explores the latest developments in technologically advanced personalized data targeting, the role of the leading online marketing companies, new approaches to policy, its impact on diverse and progressive media content, and implications for the future of democracy and human rights.

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Chris Finan speaks as the 2011 John Swan Lecturer

Vermont Library Association announces the 2011

John Swan Lecture for Intellectual Freedom

Featuring

Christopher Finan

 Author, President of ABFFE, Chair of National Coalition Anagaist Censorchip

President of American Booksellers Foundation for Free Expression (ABFFE), member of the Media Coalition and member and chair of the board of the National Coalition Against Censorship, recipient of the 2011 Freedom to Read Foundation (FTRF) Roll of Honor Award and 2008 winner of Eli Oboler Award speaking about his  book

 From the Palmer Raids to the Patriot Act: A History of the Fight for Free Speech in America

Thursday, August 25, 2011

4 p.m.

Sherburne Memorial Library     2998 River Road Killington,VT

Book signing and reception immediately following. 

Free and open to the public

VLA Members Craft ALA Resolution to Enhance Reader Privacy Protections

VLA members Trina Magi,  UVM Bailey Howe Library,  Gail Weymouth, Director of  Killington’s  Sherburne Memorial Library and Nancy Wilson, Director of Bristol’s Lawrence Memorial Library played  major roles in the creation  and adoption of  an ALA Resolution to better protect reader privacy.

  The Intellectual Freedom Committee and the IFC Privacy Subcommittee developed the “Resolution to Protect Library User Confidentiality in Self-Service Hold Practices” after receiving requests from librarians and library users to examine the issue of reader privacy and self-service holds.  Prior to last month’s ALA Annual Conference in New Orleans, the Office for Intellectual Freedom distributed the resolution for comment, and an open hearing was held during Conference for comments.  That process led to a revision of the resolution and what the IFC believes to be an improved version.

The final resolution as presented by the Intellectual Freedom Committee was adopted by the ALA Council on June 28.

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