Resolution to honor Judith Krug

The following resolution will be introduced at the VLA annual meeting tomorrow at 4:45 in the ampitheatre at the Sheraton.

Resolution Honoring Judith F. Krug (1940-2009)

Whereas Judith F. Krug was the public face of our profession’s every effort to preserve, protect and defend the First Amendment right to freedom of expression and the corollary right to receive ideas, information and images so essential to the functioning of a free and democratic society throughout her long and distinguished tenure as director of the Office for Intellectual Freedom of the American Library Association since 1967 and as director of the Freedom to Read Foundation since 1969; andRead More

Judith Krug – Librarian, Hero, Mentor, Friend

I’ve struggled for words to describe Judith Krug’s influence on my life since her death April 11, 2009. I dare not aspire to do her legacy justice when so many others have paid tribute so eloquently. See: http://www.ala.org/ala/aboutala/offices/oif/rememberingjudith.cfm
I attended her service driven by a desperate need to be among those who recognized how extraordinary Judith was, and felt the magnitude of her loss, not only personally, but for the country and the world. The tightly woven fabric of her family and their generosity of sprit was awe inspiring. I am forever grateful that they shared so much of her with us.

I sat surrounded by my family, not by blood, but a bond of love, common purpose and respect that Judith knowingly propagated, then carefully cultivated and nurtured. Her boundless love and compassion will carry us through these rapids of sorrow and grief. We will carry on and carry the flame. Thank you dear Judith, my hero, my mentor, my friend and most cherished- my surrogate mom.

Gail Weymouth   Sherburne Memorial Library   Killington

VLA IFC /ALAIFC

“Tango” tops challenged books list for third consecutive year

The Office for Intellectual Freedom has released our list of the Top Ten Most Frequently Challenged Books of 2008. The list is available below and on the OIF website and you can find more information in the ALA press release about the 2008 list.

The children’s book, “And Tango Makes Three,” by Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell, remains at the top of the list for the third year in a row. “Tango” still faces frequent challenges for reasons that include religious viewpoint, homosexuality, and age appropriateness.

OIF received a total of 513 challenges in 2008, up from 420 total challenges in 2007. For every challenge reported to OIF, however, we estimate that there are 4 or 5 challenges that go unreported.

“Tango” tops challenged books list for third consecutive year

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Bill proposes ISPs, Wi-Fi keep logs for police

February 19, 2009 10:45 PM PST
by Declan McCullagh
http://news.cnet.com/8301-13578_3-10168114-38.html?tag=nl.e703

Republican politicians on Thursday called for a sweeping new federal law that would require all Internet providers and operators of millions of Wi-Fi access points, even hotels, local coffee shops, and home users, to keep records about users for two years to aid police investigations.

The legislation, which echoes a measure proposed by one of their Democratic colleagues three years ago, would impose unprecedented data retention requirements on a broad swath of Internet access providers and is certain to draw fire from businesses and privacy advocates.

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ALA Office of Itellectual Freedom looking for challenged books

"OIF Seeks Reports of Book Challenges in 2008"

http://blogs.ala.org/oif.php?p=2980&more=1&c=1&tb=1&pb=1

With the end of the year approaching, the Office for Intellectual
Freedom will be compiling our yearly list of most frequently challenged
books. We collect information for our challenge database from newspapers
and reports submitted by individuals and, while we know that many
challenges are never reported, we strive to be as comprehensive as
possible in our records. We would greatly appreciate if you could send
us any information on challenges in your library or school from 2008.

2009 ProQuest/SIRS State and Regional Intellectual Freedom Award – Call for Nominations

Nominate a defender of intellectual freedom for a prestigious award!

The ProQuest/SIRS State and Regional Intellectual Freedom Achievement Award is given to the most innovative and effective intellectual freedom project covering a state or region.

The award is sponsored by ALA’s Intellectual Freedom Roundtable and ProQuest and consists of a citation and $1,000.

Programs may be one-time, one-year or ongoing/multi-year efforts.

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VT Library Confidentiality Act Panel

Vermont Law Review Symposium
EXAMINING OUR PRIORITIES: BALANCING NATIONAL SECURITY WITH OTHER FUNDAMENTAL VALUES
AT THE JONATHAN B CHASE COMMUNITY CENTER, VT LAW SCHOOL

OCTOBER 17, 2008

This symposium,sponsored by the Vermont Law Review, features keynote speaker Louis Fisher, constitutional law scholar with the Library of Congress and an expert in national security issues who is often called upon to testify before Congress. His newest book, 9/11 and the Constitution,  was released in August. Expert panels will discuss a variety of topics including immigration, environmental law, protecting library records, and the right to dissent

8:30 OPENING REMARKS by Geoffrey Shields

8: 45 – Vermont Library Patron’s Confidentiality Act
Gail Weymouth, Chairwoman of the VT Library Association Intellectual Freedom Committee
Jane Woldow, Vermont Law School Librarian
Retta Dunlop, Executive Director of Vermonters for Better EducationRead More

Celebrate Judith Flint

Arthur Milnes, guest commentator on Vermont Public Radio, celebrates Judith Flint of the Kimball Public Library in Randolph for her defense of patron confidentiality when the FBI appeared. Milnes:

Judith Flint’s example gives me hope – despite the challenges on both sides of the border and in the wider world as our necessary war on terror continues.  While I have never met her – and probably never will – I am confident that to the children and families in Randolph she is a true friend.

Read the commentary at VPR or hear the podcast.

Amy Howlett

VT Department of Libraries